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    “Guess what: God created beings not to act in a morality play but to experience what is unfathomable, to elicit what can become, to descend into the darkness of creation and reveal it to him, to mourn and celebrate enigma and possibility. The universe is a whirling dervish, not a hanging judge in robes.”  —Richard Grossinger

    “Guess what: God created beings not to act in a morality play but to experience what is unfathomable, to elicit what can become, to descend into the darkness of creation and reveal it to him, to mourn and celebrate enigma and possibility. The universe is a whirling dervish, not a hanging judge in robes.”
    Richard Grossinger

     
  2. The Archbishop of Canterbury is inviting young people - from across the Anglican Communion - to experience and live monastic community in Lambeth Palace. To this end he is establishing a new monastic community, the Community of St Anselm.

    According to the Lambeth Palace press release, “Members of the Community will live in a way the ancient monastics would recognise: drawing closer to God through a daily rhythm of silence, study and prayer. But, through those disciplines, they will also be immersed in the modern challenges of the global 21st century church”.

    thanks to catholicity and covenant

     
  3. Typical white-collar American life is quite conducive to dharma pursuits. But for those of us who don’t have access to that lifestyle—or have lost it—the path is doubly frustrating. We wind our way through the minefield of financial insecurity while trying simultaneously to cultivate a fulfilling practice in solitude. Those of us in the lower class have no real disposable income, no truly “free” time, and we have to keep up a break-neck speed just to break even.

     
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  5. "For an earliest generation of Christians, Jesus was not the Savior but the Life-giver. In the original Aramaic of Jesus and his followers, there was no word for salvation. Salvation was understood as bestowal of life, and to be saved was “to be made alive.” This gift of life, moreover, was received in a clear rite of initiation, following the pattern of Jesus’ own initiation. According to the ancient, Aramaic-derived traditions, Jesus’ divine sonship began not in his sacrificial death on the cross, but in his spirit-filled baptism in the Jordan River. Entering the waters at the hand of John the Baptist, he emerged as the Life-giver (in Syriac, “Mahyana”), upon whom the Spirit “rested.” He came forth also as “Ihidaya,” “the only one,” or “the Unified One,” and in this pattern his initiates became known also as “ihidaye,” “those who are one.” This early Aramaic Christianity—scholars call it “Spirit Christology” —knew nothing of dying and rising with Christ, but only of a larger, more vivified and unified life made possible through the indwelling of the Spirit.” –Cynthia Bourgeault, “The Gift of Life,” on the unified vision of the desert fathers, Parabola Magazine, Summer 1989 

    "For an earliest generation of Christians, Jesus was not the Savior but the Life-giver. In the original Aramaic of Jesus and his followers, there was no word for salvation. Salvation was understood as bestowal of life, and to be saved was “to be made alive.”

    This gift of life, moreover, was received in a clear rite of initiation, following the pattern of Jesus’ own initiation. According to the ancient, Aramaic-derived traditions, Jesus’ divine sonship began not in his sacrificial death on the cross, but in his spirit-filled baptism in the Jordan River. Entering the waters at the hand of John the Baptist, he emerged as the Life-giver (in Syriac, “Mahyana”), upon whom the Spirit “rested.” He came forth also as “Ihidaya,” “the only one,” or “the Unified One,” and in this pattern his initiates became known also as “ihidaye,” “those who are one.” This early Aramaic Christianity—scholars call it “Spirit Christology” —knew nothing of dying and rising with Christ, but only of a larger, more vivified and unified life made possible through the indwelling of the Spirit.”

    –Cynthia Bourgeault, “The Gift of Life,” on the unified vision of the desert fathers, Parabola Magazine, Summer 1989 

     
  6. My primary concern is that a sexual asceticism has become a repressive legalism. We’ve taken something made to enhance our lives [a sexual ethic], and turned into something that robs us of our lives. Evangelicals are widely known to say that sex is “a gift,” but their doctrine is saying otherwise…In Christian conservative bubbles guilt and shame have become more deadly than any sexually transmitted disease.’ - Andy Gill

     
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  8. "The worship of power is precisely what Judaism came into being to challenge. We were the slaves, the powerless, and though the Torah talks of God using a strong arm to redeem the Israelites from Egyptian slavery, it simultaneously insists, over and over again, that when Jews go into their promised land in Canaan (now Palestine) they must “love the stranger/the other,” have only one law for the stranger and for the native born, and warns “do not oppress the stranger/the other.” Remember, Torah reminds us, “that you were strangers/the other in the land of Egypt” and “you know the heart of the stranger.” Later sources in Judaism even insist that a person without compassion who claims to be Jewish cannot be considered Jewish. A spirit of generosity is so integral to Torah consciousness that when Jews are told to let the land lie fallow once every seven years (the societal-wide Sabbatical Year), they must allow that which grows spontaneously from past plantings to be shared with the other/the stranger.

    The Jews are not unique in this. The basic reality is that most of humanity has always heard a voice inside themselves telling them that the best path to security and safety is to love others and show generosity, and a counter voice that tells us that the only path to security is domination and control over others. This struggle between the voice of fear and the voice of love, the voice of domination/power-over and the voice of compassion, and empathy and generosity, have played out throughout history and shape contemporary political debates around the world.” - Rabbi Michael Lerner

     
  9. When Christians idolize certainty, the concept of “the mystery of God” is a direct threat to their ideologies. Therefore, almost every situation and question has an answer and explanation. Everything is black and white—nothing is gray. And while society shifts and creates moral questions that are harder and harder to answer, instead of humble reflection, some Christians simply rework and evolve their answers to remain true to their original beliefs—no matter how complicated, confusing or ridiculous the answers are. To them, any answer is better than not having an answer at all, which they view as a sign of extreme weakness and stupidity.
    — (via sjmattson)
     
  10. quakerradical:

    “The idea of the Gospel was a totally different logic of emancipation, of justice, of freedom. Within a pagan world, injustice meant a disturbance of natural order. In pagan traditions, justice was defined in what today we would call fascistic terms, each in his or her place in the hierarchy….